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Home Installation Services Catonsville MD

The number 1 mistake in the installation of a home is bad site prep. If you don’t get this right the rest doesn’t really matter. No body wants to do it because it is the other guys job. The other guy might be the customer. If you let him botch the job then the rest still doesn’t matter. Explaining to the consumer that his home is a mess because he signed a paper that said he would do something and he didn't do it very well. I have never understood why anyone would want to put themselves in a position to knowingly be part of a messed up home.

Alterego
8003391179
640 Frederick Rd.
Baltimore, MD

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Baltimore Green Construction
4108893193
814 W. 36th Street
Baltimore, MD

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Bridge Private Lending
4105831990
100 W. Pennsylvania Ave., Ste.4
Towson,, MD

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Revolution Window Systems
4105220360
4401 eastern Ave. Suite 45-G
Baltimore, MD

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Green Building Alternatives, LLC
4105288899
30 Greenway NW, Suite 11
Glen Burnie, MD

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Cole Roofing Co., Inc.
410-242-0600
3915 Coolidge Ave.
Baltimore, MD
 
TerraLogos EcoArchitecture, PC
4434517130
1101 E. 33rd. Street Suite B301
Baltimore, MD

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JG Architectural Supply
8774824771
513 Progress Drive, Suite K
Linthicum, MD

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The Loading Dock, Inc. (TLD)
4105583625
2 North Kresson St.
Baltimore, MD

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Greencastle
4104776771
3106 Whiteway Road
Baltimore, MD

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Most Common Mistakes in a Setup

Most Common Mistakes in a Setup
Sun 11/30/08 09:01:33 pm
by George Porter

George PorterSomeone once said that mistakes are golden opportunities for learning.   So… If you make a mistake and you don’t get caught then you learn that you can get away with it!   This might not be what the original “Ol’ Saying” had in mind but, it is true that if no one points out the problem then how do you know you did the wrong thing?

 

With this in mind let me tell you about some common problems I have found. Now keep in mind that you can pick apart any installation if you look hard enough.   These are things that will cause very serious noticeable problems.   For instance, one too many blocks in the stack is a “violation”, but if you didn’t know it you would never have a problem from it.   Not anchored right would not fall in the same category.

 

The number 1 mistake in the installation of a home is bad site prep.   If you don’t get this right the rest doesn’t really matter.   No body wants to do it because it is the other guys job.   The other guy might be the customer.   If you let him botch the job then the rest still doesn’t matter.   Explaining to the consumer that his home is a mess because he signed a paper that said he would do something and he didn’t do it very well.   I have never understood why anyone would want to put themselves in a position to knowingly be part of a messed up home.   I guess some don’t care but either way it is the biggest problem by far and just about the easiest to avoid.   Just use the customer’s money to grade the customer’s lot correctly.   Do that and 75% of all the problems you could have had will not occur.   Here is how you do this right.   Make the water run away from all sides of the home by 10 feet and stay away.   Do not let any water get under the home, ever!   What ever it takes to do this is what should and must be done.

 

Marriage line close up is somewhere after the lot problem.   The most common problem is when you use lag screws to secure the two halves together.   First let me say that not all homes use lags and if you decide to use them where they don’t go you will really mess up the home.   Fleetwood uses an engineered beam in SOME of its homes.   It is called a TJI beam and it is made of small components but is very strong.   It looks like a wooden I beam with flanges at the top and bottom.   The top flange is definitely not big enough to absorb a 3/8 inch lag.   It will split, shatter, come apart, and generally cease to function.   Make this dumb move and you have really created a mess.   There is little to no strength in the beam when one of the flanges is destroyed and this thing holds up the roof.   It is not cheap to fix either.

This type beam and many others use straps.

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